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Concrete Theory Draws on Napkins December 6, 2009

Posted by mgodoublems in Book Analysis.
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Last night I finished reading The Back of the Napkin by Dan Roam.  The My Little Black Sketchbook post line spawned from reading it.  Roam writes an extremely interesting book, defining a process for visual thinking that just works… I went from not being able to easily think visually to being able to produce visual thought diagrams in a short order over the course of the book.

I will be incorporating the things I have learned from this book into a majority of my work in the future.  Book analysis after the jump.  I’m just going to go over the final chapter, because it’s a book that really needs to be read by anyone that is interest in visual thinking and advancing their ability to express themselves.  Note: It’s not 1000 words, but it has a picture, so it is really over 1000.  The book is really a must-read.

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Concrete Theory Lacks Stickiness November 27, 2009

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I have just finished The Tipping Point, by Malcolm Gladwell.  My second book in as many weeks by him.  This book, as with all of Gladwell’s books, has been remarkably thought-provoking.  Gladwell is an author of such talent that I am disappointed that I did not pick up his books a few years ago, when I was first prompted to by one of my professors.  He takes concepts that are impossibly large and makes them relatively simple to fathom, and I will gladly add this book to my permanent bookshelf.  I feel that I have been building a book collection that I will continuously reference from this point forward.

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Concrete Theory Strives to be a Spime November 26, 2009

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A month or so ago, I read a book called Shaping Things by Bruce Sterling.  This book is very broad, and for the most part deals with easily-understood topics, though there is a definite point where it reaches into the imagination concerning the future of thought organization.  Shaping Things divides society into technological epochs, and explains how they mesh and where society is going and must go for the next evolution to happen.

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Concrete Theory Exists in Two Dimensions November 24, 2009

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I just recently – today, on my flight back from an interview in Chicago (which went well) – finished reading Flatland, by Edwin A. Abbott.  Professor John Marshall recommended this book to me, and it is a truly remarkable analogue of some aspects of modern society for having been written in – get this – 1884.  I’ll explain why.  I won’t cover everything, but I will attempt to touch on the larger analogues.

The book is extremely abstract, and heavily influenced by  the author’s choice of vocation – Abbott was a clergyman.  However, it was somewhat heretical, and definitely can not be considered to be a ‘religious’ book by any means.

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Concrete Theory Thinks Without Thinking November 22, 2009

Posted by mgodoublems in Book Analysis.
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One of the things that I intend to do is take whatever books that I have finished reading and tie them in to the big picture.

I recently finished reading Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink.  For those of you who don’t know who Malcolm Gladwell is, he has written four books, The Tipping Point, Blink, Outliers, and What the Dog Saw.  He also writes for The New Yorker and has his own Blog. I am currently reading Tipping Point, but I am going to make a point of not talking about books that I haven’t finished yet – without going cover to cover, I feel that I am not of enough authority on a book-based idea to speak of it.  I have also read Outliers, but do not have my copy at school with me, so I cannot make a post that directly references it until I am at home for Christmas.

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